A native Colorado artist, Gordon Brown, has been professionally

painting for 30 years. His paintings characteristically highlight his

ability to romanticize atmospheric elements; dawn, twilight,

clouds, storms, haze, and fog. These elements act as abstractions

within his compositions. With a passion for pulsating

natural beauty—both moody and atmospheric—dominating his

paintings, there is only an occasional glimpse of that “blue

sky.” Crashing surf, passing storms, and vivid sunlit vistas set

off by a ceiling of shadowy, moody heavens that are populated

by wispy clouds—all are signature elements of a Gordon

Brown landscape. Growing up near the Grand Mesa of Colorado

has no doubt seeped into Brown’s æsthetic and artistic

vision, working as a compass to guide his initial responses to

painting.

 

Brown freely admits, “I borrowed from the old masters, the

modern masters, and every artist I know. I'm always experimenting,

occasionally destroying and not worrying if it will work

or not; being childlike, that’s how I approach painting.” This

unwavering commitment to diversity—testing his limits and

looking for more ways to interpret on canvas what he sees—has

kept Brown’s work fresh and ever-evolving. In his short career

of nearly thirty years, Gordon Brown has carved a solid niche

for himself as a “new” old master of the luminous landscape.

 

Brown has recently developed new techniques to alter his

surface texture, specifically in his abs tract paintings. He utilizes

masonite board or aluminum sheets as rigid substrates so that

he can scratch into the built-up layers of paint.

A native Colorado artist, Gordon Brown, has been professionally

painting for 30 years. His paintings characteristically highlight his

ability to romanticize atmospheric elements; dawn, twilight,

clouds, storms, haze, and fog. These elements act as abstractions

within his compositions. With a passion for pulsating

natural beauty—both moody and atmospheric—dominating his

paintings, there is only an occasional glimpse of that “blue

sky.” Crashing surf, passing storms, and vivid sunlit vistas set

off by a ceiling of shadowy, moody heavens that are populated

by wispy clouds—all are signature elements of a Gordon

Brown landscape. Growing up near the Grand Mesa of Colorado

has no doubt seeped into Brown’s æsthetic and artistic

vision, working as a compass to guide his initial responses to

painting.

 

Brown freely admits, “I borrowed from the old masters, the

modern masters, and every artist I know. I'm always experimenting,

occasionally destroying and not worrying if it will work

or not; being childlike, that’s how I approach painting.” This

unwavering commitment to diversity—testing his limits and

looking for more ways to interpret on canvas what he sees—has

kept Brown’s work fresh and ever-evolving. In his short career

of nearly thirty years, Gordon Brown has carved a solid niche

for himself as a “new” old master of the luminous landscape.

 

Brown has recently developed new techniques to alter his

surface texture, specifically in his abs tract paintings. He utilizes

masonite board or aluminum sheets as rigid substrates so that

he can scratch into the built-up layers of paint.